Concentration

Concentration; the action or power of focusing one’s attention.

We’ve all mastered the art of distraction as we practice it 13-14 hrs a day. We talking to someone our phone blinks, wam! Our awareness goes to the phone. We’re reading a book and we remember something interesting that happened yesterday (eg the fun you had with your crush 😁) and you forget you’re reading and dwell your mind on your crush, or you’re working on something and your phone beeps or a thought comes across, BAM! Our focus is taken. We’re all easily distracted, as we’ve practiced it all our lives.

When we are in love, we freely do things for each other without thought of cost or sacrifice. We will drive 500 miles or extra in order to spend a weekend together. The person we love seems to be perfect. We don’t stay in the euphoric stage of love forever. Actually, this is good because it is difficult to concentrate on
anything else when you are in love. If you are in college when you fall in love, your grades will likely decline. When we are in love, the rest of the world doesn’t matter. We are totally
focused on being with each other and making each other happy. L.I.M (laughing in my mind) I haven’t really experienced this, Gary Chapman said and experienced this. I’ve only had one or two crush(es) here and there. One of these days we’ll talk about crushes, relationships and love.😁😍

A wise man once said “While reading, working or doing something (usually productive) concentrate your attention just like the lasers. I’ve forgotten where I read this from (probably because I didn’t concentrate…lol😁).

Lasers are separate rays/beams of light coming together to focus (concentrate) one point. They can cut through diamonds! (One of the hardest substances on earth). There’s this interesting fact about Lasers. This one was gotten from NASA;

Light travels in waves. Each colour of light has a different wavelength. For example, blue light has a shorter wavelength than red light. Sunlight—and the typical light from a lightbulb—is made up of light with many different wavelengths. Our eyes see this mixture of wavelengths as white light.

A laser is different. Lasers do not occur in nature. However, we have figured ways to artificially create this special type of light. Lasers produce a narrow beam of light in which all of the light waves have very similar wavelengths. The laser’s light waves travel together with their peaks all lined up, or in phase. This is why laser beams are very narrow, very bright, and can be focused (concentrated) into a very tiny spot.

Because laser light stays focused and does not spread out much (like a flashlight/torch would), laser beams can travel very long distances. They can also concentrate a lot of energy on a very small area.
Lasers have many uses. They are used in precision tools and can cut through diamonds or thick metal.

Lasers are separate rays/beams of light coming together to focus (concentrate) one point. They can cut through diamonds!

FYI! For those of us that don’t know, DIAMONDS ARE THE HARDEST OBJECTS IN THE WORLD, IT’S ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TO CUT THROUGH DIAMONDS. Yet lasers cut through it, why? Because they were concentrated.

Here’s an excerpt from Josh Foer’s moonwalking with Einstein. Bill gates himself recommended this book to us, trust me, it’s a good read, go get it!. He says;

When the point of reading is…remembering, you approach a text very differently than most of us do today. Now we put a premium on reading quickly and widely, and that breeds a kind of superficiality in our reading, and in what we seek to get out of books. You can’t read a page a minute, the rate at which you’re
probably reading this book, and expect to remember what you’ve read for any considerable length of time. If something is going to be made memorable, it has to be dwelled upon, repeatedly.

Today, we read books “extensively,” without much in the way of sustained focus (concentration), and, with rare exceptions, we read each book only once. We value quantity of reading over quality of reading. We have no choice, if we want to keep up with the broader culture. Even in the most highly specialized fields, it can be a Sisyphean task to try to stay on top of the ever growing mountain of words loosed upon the world each day. Few of us make any serious effort to remember what we read. When I read a book, what do I hope will stay with me a year later?

What causes this lack of concentration?

It could be caused by the devil or when we think we’re mentally deficient or years of practice of letting the mind do what ever it wants to do or lack vitamins, especially vitamin B.
Extreme fatigue can affect concentration. Oftentimes, lack of comprehension is due to lack of concentration.
I know that, for myself, I can read a book or chapter in the Bible and all of a sudden realize that I do not know what I have read at all. I can go back
and read it again, and it all seems new to me because, even though my eyes were scanning the words on the page, my mind had wandered off somewhere else. Because I did not stay focused on what I was doing, I
failed to comprehend what I was reading. This also happens to Joyce Meyer too. She talked about this in one of the chapters in her book “battlefield of the mind”, she calls it “the wandering mind” she said;

I have decided that if the devil went to the trouble to attack me with a wandering mind, then perhaps something was being said that I needed to
hear.

So there you have it folks, lack of concentration doesn’t make our reading or work very productive. Like Josh Foer said ”

If something is going to be made memorable, it has to be dwelled upon, repeatedly… with sustained focus (concentration)

Let’s do away with lack of concentration. it’s been an habit all our lives. And like every habit, it’s hard to come out of except you deliberately and repeatedly practice it – “the art of concentration”.

Peace out chappies ✌🏾

Ciao!

Sources; Battlefield of the mind – Joyce Meyer

Things I wished I knew before I got married – Gary Chapman

Moonwalking with Einstein – Josh Foer

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/laser/en/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s